• Video: A Return to Basic Research in the Study of Democracy

    The public lecture “A Return to Basic Research in the Study of Democracy” by Prof. Jean-Paul Gagnon (Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis, University of Canberra) took place on September 13, 2018 at the University of Zurich. You can find the video of the event below. We thank the Chair of Political Philosophy and the Chair of Democracy and Public Governance of the University of Zurich for their support, as well as the Peer-Group poliTics (ETH/UZH) for offering the following apéro. The lecture took place in the framework of the DemocracyNet research workshop “Democratic Participation: theoretical and empirical perspectives.”

  • Public Lecture: “A Return to Basic Research in the Study of Democracy”

    On September 13, 2018, Prof. Jean-Paul Gagnon (Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis, University of Canberra) will give a public lecture on his research in democratic theory, “A Return to Basic Research in the Study of Democracy” University of Zurich Rämistrasse 59, 8001 Zurich Lecture hall RAA-G-15 18:30 – 20:00 Free entrance Apéro The public lecture is organized by DemocracyNet in collaboration with the Chair of Political Philosophy, the Center for Ethics, and the Chair of Democracy and Public Governance of the University of Zurich. Apéro sponsored by the Peer-Group poliTics It is part of the workshop “Democratic participation: theoretical and empirical perspectives” co-organized by DemocracyNet and the Doctoral Program…

  • “Elfenbeinturm oder Arena? Wisschenschaft in der Demokratie”

    The fourth and final public event of the series “Democracy: Bridging Facts and Norms” took place on October 20, 2016, at the University of Zurich. An audience of about 180 persons followed the engaged discussion about the role of academics and science in democratic societies between Katja Gentinetta, Svenja Goltermann, Michael Hermann and Thomas Widmer. Moderating the debate, the journalist Peer Teuwsen invited our participants to focus, among other things, on the following questions: Should academics participate in public debates, and if so, when and how? Can social sciences and humanities offer objective contributions to democratic discussions? And what is the impact of becoming a ‘public intellectual’ on one’s academic…